Skip to content
Pre-loader

Visa Eligibility and Mental Health: Understanding Class “A” and Class “B” Conditions

By George Lake

In the world of visa applications, medical evaluations play a significant role in determining an applicant’s eligibility. One crucial aspect of this process is assessing an applicant’s physical and mental health, particularly when associated with harmful behaviors. The U.S. Department of State outlines these evaluations in 9 FAM 302.2-7(B)(7), which establishes criteria for Class “A” and Class “B” conditions that affect visa eligibility.

Class “A” Conditions: A Closer Look

Class “A” medical conditions are those that render a visa applicant ineligible to receive a visa. This classification primarily focuses on applicants with physical or mental disorders associated with harmful behaviors. These conditions are taken seriously and can be grounds for visa ineligibility. Class “A” conditions can be further divided into two categories:

1. Current Physical or Mental Disorder with Associated Harmful Behavior: This includes individuals who have a present physical or mental disorder that is linked to harmful behaviors. The harm may be directed towards themselves or others.

2. History of Mental Disorder with Associated Harmful Behavior Likely to Recur: In cases where an applicant has a history of mental disorder with associated harmful behavior, they may be considered Class “A” if there is a likelihood of the harmful behavior recurring or leading to further harm in the future.

Class “B” Conditions: A Different Perspective

Class “B” medical conditions, on the other hand, are not grounds for visa ineligibility. These conditions refer to physical or mental abnormalities, diseases, or disabilities that, while serious in degree or nature, do not substantially depart from general well-being. Class “B” conditions are less severe than Class “A” conditions and do not automatically disqualify an applicant from obtaining a visa.

Deferment and Multiple Classifications

In cases where a panel physician cannot definitively determine whether an applicant has a diagnosis of a physical or mental disorder or substance-related disorder, classification may be deferred. This means that additional medical evidence is needed to make a clear determination. During this period, the panel physician may request the applicant’s cooperation in reevaluating their condition within the next 3 to 6 months to determine if abstinence or improvements are evident.

It’s also important to note that applicants may receive multiple classifications, but they cannot be classified as both Class “A” and “B” for the same physical or mental disorder.

Classification and Descriptions

To provide clarity in the evaluation process, the FAM outlines specific classifications and descriptions for different scenarios:

1. No Class “A” or Class “B” Classification: This applies to applicants with no diagnosis of a physical or mental disorder or substance-related disorder.

2. Class “A” Physical or Mental Disorder with Associated Harmful Behavior or History of Such Behavior Likely to Recur: This classification includes individuals with current physical or mental disorders associated with harmful behaviors. It also encompasses harmful behaviors related to substances not listed in Schedule I-V of Section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act.

3. Class “B” Current Physical or Mental Disorder with No Associated Harmful Behavior: Applicants in this category have physical or mental disorders but do not exhibit harmful behaviors. It also includes conditions related to substances not listed in Schedule I-V of Section 202 of the Controlled Substances Act.

4. Class “B” History of Physical or Mental Disorder with Associated Harmful Behavior Unlikely to Recur: This classification pertains to individuals who have a history of physical or mental disorders with associated harmful behaviors, but there is a low likelihood of such behaviors recurring.

Conclusion

Understanding the distinctions between Class “A” and Class “B” conditions in visa applications is crucial for both applicants and immigration authorities. While Class “A” conditions can lead to visa ineligibility due to the severity of associated harmful behaviors, Class “B” conditions, although serious, do not automatically disqualify applicants. Deferment and the possibility of multiple classifications underscore the importance of medical evaluations in visa eligibility determinations. Visa applicants should be aware of these criteria and work closely with panel physicians to ensure a comprehensive evaluation of their medical condition.